Posts Tagged ‘MetalliScanner’

We often get asked, why does my stud finder have trouble with lath and plaster when it works perfectly through drywall? Or, what is the best tool or technique for finding studs in lath and plaster walls?

The front of this lath and plaster wall is smooth - no problem for your stud finder.

The front of this lath and plaster wall is smooth – no problem for your stud finder.

Your Zircon stud finder finds studs by looking for an increase in density compared to where it was first calibrated on the wall.  Drywall and other manufactured sheet materials have very consistent density, but lath and plaster walls have very inconsistent density on the backside of the wall. This is where the plaster is squeezed between the lath and ‘keys’ onto the back of the lath and holds the plaster in place.

So, even if the front of the wall has a very smooth texture, the back of the wall is what gives your stud finder trouble because there are changes in density everywhere as you scan.

Shown here is a peek behind the wall. Lath and plaster walls have an irregular surface that are a problem for stud finders.

Shown here is a peek behind the wall. Lath and plaster walls have an irregular surface that are a problem for stud finders.

As a result, your stud finder can show a false positive (a stud indication when it is actually not a stud) when it finds an increase in density, even if it is just a glob of plaster.

The best solution is to use a Zircon MultiScanner® wall scanner that has Metal Scan Mode or one of Zircon’s dedicated metal detectors, such as the MetalliScanner® m40 or MetalliScanner® MT 6, so you can find the little nails or tacks that are fastening every piece of wood lath to the studs.

Use a Zircon metal detector to locate the nails that fasten each piece of lath to the studs.

Use a Zircon metal detector to locate the nails that fasten each piece of lath to the studs.

Since you can detect the nail heads all the way up and down the entire height of the stud with the Metal Scan mode, this is a much more reliable way to find studs.

Please see the video demo of an m40 finding studs through lath and plaster on the Zircon web site.

Note:  All photos were taken in a test lab environment.

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Kurt Stauss at Honeywell

Classroom training started with a video, followed by questions and answers, hands-on training on demonstration walls, and a written applications test.

Zircon has received requests for training at large industrial complexes around the country because the safety departments now require workers to fill out a form certifying that they have scanned the wall, floor or ceiling before workers penetrate these materials, whether they are concrete or drywall.

As these photos show, I conducted classroom and hands-on training for subcontractors who work at a Department of Energy (DOE) site managed by Honeywell, near Kansas City.  Each attendee was trained in the usage of the Zircon MetalliScanner MT6 and the Zircon MultiScanner i500. At the end of the training session, the attendees received a certificate after demonstrating basic proficiency in operating the MT6 and the MultiScanner i500.

The head of the safety department personally researched and tested various brands of metal detectors for concrete and multi-function wall scanners (stud finders) for drywall.  He could have selected different vendors for each category, but Zircon was selected to fulfill both goals based on the performance of the tools, and especially because of their ease of use.

Kurt Stauss at Honeywell near wall

First step in the training was to demonstrate that the MT6 worked in the environment, by locating high voltage lines in conduit in the wall behind me here

Before starting the classroom training, I was asked to demonstrate the MT6 onsite, as this would get the men excited about the capabilities of the MT6. At the onsite location, inside the wall behind me, there were high voltage electrical lines, but they didn’t tell me that.

I was easily able to locate and trace the power lines inside the steel conduit by using the MT6.  Of course, conduit offers some protection in many cases, but if a worker core drills through the wall in that location, it would cut through the conduit (and high voltage lines) like a hot knife through butter! The workers were thoroughly impressed with the performance of the MT6. (They want to get home safe every night)!

Kurt Stauss at Honeywell 3

The class laughed when one guy commented on how surprised he was that the MT6 works so well, considering how inexpensive it is.

I recently did a similar training at an Intel Chip Fab facility in Arizona and they selected the Zircon MetalliScanner MT6 and the MultiScanner i500.  One comment I hear repeatedly is that they knew about Zircon stud finders, but they had no idea Zircon also made such awesome concrete scanners!

(Note: Cameras are not allowed inside the high security DOE facility, but the photos were sent to me by a DOE staff photographer).

Zircon’s in the Real Blogs also provide a service and training perspective on popular subjects, such as the blog, “Does it Have X-Ray Vision?” For additional insights, please also visit us @zircontools, like us on Facebook or ivsit http://www.zircon.com.